Punting in Cambridge To Celebrate Special Occasions

When my son’s British fiancé told us we were celebrating their engagement by going punting in Cambridge, I imagined kicking the pigskin around a ballpark. But the English don’t play American football. Then I thought it must have something to do with rugby, as her brother-in-law is an avid rugby man.

Well, what a surprise! Punting has nothing to do with playing ball on a pitch (field), but instead involves a boat on a river.

Imagine skimming across the water in a “punt.” Picture a Venetian gondola that is shaped like a flat-bottomed, mini-barge.

In Cambridge punting along River Cam leads you past the famous colleges of the University of Cambridge. Founded as far back as 800 years ago, each contains its own history, architecture and stories.

The punt, dating back to medieval times, allowed navigation in shallow water areas. Until recently commercial fishermen used punts to work the fens of East Anglia. In 1870 punting for pleasure began, becoming more common in the 1900s and today is considered a part of the Cambridge experience.

A person navigates by standing on the till (known as the deck) at the back, not paddling, but poling. It looks easy. It’s not. Imagine trying to propel a dozen hefty passengers forward by pushing off the river bottom with a pole vault stick.

Poles, usually made of spruce 12-16 feet long, have a shoe, a rounded lump of metal on one end in the shape of swallow’s tail. Without a rudder, the punt is difficult to steer and the pole can get stuck in the river bottom.

Our next dilemma was who was going to pole the punt?

I assumed David would guide us down the River Cam, but sidelined by a rugby injury, he couldn’t even bend his knee enough to climb into the boat.

Fortunately Larissa and her sister, Charlotte, had the foresight to barter for tickets that included a guide. From the Quayside Punting Station near Magdalene Bridge, we clambered into the low seats of the punt.

Like a modern day Huck Finn, a handsome, young man in khakis and a white shirt stood in the stern grasping his pole. In the voice of a great orator, he recounted the history and legends surrounding the colleges of Cambridge during our 45-minute ride up one side of the Cam and then down the other.

“The Backs refers to a one-mile stretch past the rear sides of some of England’s most prestigious and oldest universities,” our guide said. “A few of the famous colleges, which we will be passing include Trinity College, founded by King Henry VIII in 1546; Trinity Hall, where scientist Stephen Hawking studied; and St. Johns College, which was attended by poet William Wordsworth.”

Along the riverbank people dined at outdoor cafes, college co-eds lounged on lush lawns under weeping willows and boatloads of tourists drank beer celebrating the arrival of spring. A carnival like atmosphere prevailed. Punting was like being in an amusement park on bumper boat ride and sure enough another boat slammed into our side, jarring my back.

While the skilled college guides maneuvered between boats, amateur punters spun in circles and crashed into other vessels.

“On your right is St. John’s,” our guide said, “one of the oldest and most celebrated colleges in Cambridge.”

As we passed under the city’s famous Bridge of Sighs, named after the one in Venice, the scene felt surreal.

When we opened champagne and raised our glasses to Nic and Larissa, I thought, what are the odds of small town girl from Illinois marrying a French boy from Normandy and raising a Franco-American son who’s falls in love with a beautiful English/Irish-Ukrainian girl.

How extraordinary the fate uniting our families as we celebrate toasting to their future by punting in Cambridge.


Comments

  1. Barbara Carlson

    Pat, I so enjoyed punting down the Cam with you. What a delightful way to celebrate Nic and Larissa’s engagement! Congratulations and Best Wishes for many years of happiness to Nic and Larissa.

    1. Pat McKinzie

      Thanks Barb. Glad you enjoyed the ride and I will be sure to pass on your well wishes.

  2. Kathleen Pooler

    I learn so much from you, Pat. What a delightful experience. Thanks for sharing this unique experience with us. And congratulations to you son and his girlfriend on their engagement!0

    1. Pat McKinzie

      Thanks Kathy. I hope the trip down the River Cam distracted you from the pain and that you continue to heal and get stronger everyday.

  3. Debbie

    What a lovely trip — all those historic buildings and such a gorgeous day for celebrating! Thank you, Pat, for letting us come along. I’m not sure punting is the best way to enjoy the sights (especially for those of us with back issues!), but now you can say you’ve done it, even if you never go again. Oh, tell your son Congrats on the engagement — is the wedding soon??

    1. Pat McKinzie

      Thanks Debbie glad you enjoyed the trip. The advantage to punting is that it allows you to see the back sides of the famous colleges, which you wouldn’t see otherwise. My back held up fine because the seats were low and wide and you could sort of sprawl out.

  4. Tina

    Congratulations to Nic and Larissa. Your multicultural family is growing! What a great idea for a celebration. Punting – who’ve thunk?
    Only the Brits! Thanks for sharing your adventures.

  5. 1010ParkPlace

    Hi Pat, I loved everything about your post, especially the multi cultural backgrounds of everyone. I’ve never heard of punting but would love to go. Brenda

    1. Pat McKinzie

      Thanks Brenda. With Europe as my playground, there is a story around every corner and my “UN” family gives me access to the inside scoop on different cultures. ha

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